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Text Box: CV (PDF)

 

Text Box: Publications

 

Naazneen H. Barma

 

Assistant Professor

Department of National Security Affairs

Naval Postgraduate School

 

Director

Bridging the Gap Project

 

 

Naazneen Barma is Assistant Professor of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. Her research and teaching focus on the political economy of development, natural resource governance, and international interventions in post-conflict states, with a regional specialization in East Asia. Prior to joining the faculty at NPS, Barma spent three years as a Young Professional and Public Sector Specialist in the East Asia and Pacific Region at the World Bank. In that capacity, she conducted political economy analysis and worked on issues of governance and institutional reform in East Timor, Laos, and Mongolia. Barma is currently Director of the Bridging the Gap project, an initiative devoted to enhancing the policy impact of contemporary international and comparative politics scholarship. 

 

Barma has published academic articles on governance, innovation, and institution-building in the developing world—including “Petroleum, Governance, and Fragility: The Micro Politics of Petroleum in Post-Conflict States” (in Beyond the Resource Curse, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012); and “Brokered Democracy-Building: Developing Democracy Through Transitional Governance in Cambodia, East Timor, and Afghanistan” (International Journal on Multicultural Societies, Fall 2006). She is co-editor of The Political Economy Reader: Markets as Institutions (Routledge, 2008) and co-author of Rents to Riches? The Political Economy of Natural Resource-Led Development (World Bank, 2011). She has also co-authored policy-oriented pieces on the political economic implications of the evolving international system that have appeared in Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, Foreign Policy, and The National Interest.  

 

Barma received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007. She grew up in Hong Kong and received both her BA and MA from Stanford University.